How to Batch Normalize Audio with Audacity

October 10, 2017

Batch processing in Audacity requires the use of a chain. A chain is a set of preconfigured commands that can be applied to projects or audio files. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create a chain to normalize audio with Audacity.

Create a Chain

To create a chain, navigate to File/Edit Chains.


Click the Add button to create and name a new chain. In the screenshot below, I’ve named my new chain “Normalize to -0.1dB,”


Next, click the Insert button to add commands to the chain. Since I want to create a chain to normalize and export audio files, I’ve added the Normalize and ExportWAV commands.


Some commands have editable parameters, which can be accessed by pressing the Edit Parameters button in the Select Command dialog box. For example, the Normalize command has editable parameters for removing DC offset, maximum amplitude, and normalizing stereo channels independently.


After the chain has been created, navigate to File/Apply Chain. Select the newly created normalization chain, and click Apply to Files.


Finally, select the audio files you want to normalize, and press Open.


After the batch processing is finished, the normalized files will show up in a cleaned folder in your source directory.

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What’s New in MainStage 3.3.2?

August 31, 2017

MainStage 3.3.2 was released on August 31, 2017.

Apple released MainStage 3.3.2 yesterday. While this incremental release doesn’t come with any new and exciting features, it does fix a few bugs related to stability and reliability. Apple’s complete release notes are below.

Enhancements

  • The maximum fade time in the Loopback plug-in has been extended to 60 seconds.

Stability & Reliability

  • MainStage no longer quits unexpectedly when changing the color of a Background object in the Layout.
  • Opening a MainStage concert from an alias of a folder no longer causes the MainStage preferences to be inaccessible.
  • MainStage no longer quits unexpectedly when grouping or ungrouping controls in Layout mode.

Hi, I’m Brian and I’m an electronic music designer for Broadway shows and other theatrical productions around the world. If you enjoyed this article, be sure to hold the clap button below to let the world know! 🙂
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How to Use a Mono Output in MainStage

August 30, 2017

Learn how to set up a mono output in Apple MainStage.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to set up a mono output in Apple MainStage. While most modern virtual instruments are designed to be used in stereo, certain situations may require you to fold the mix down to a mono output. There are two ways to set up a mono output in MainStage.

Use the Pan Knob

The first way to set up a mono output in MainStage is to pan your master output hard left or hard right. In the screenshot below, I’ve panned my master output hard left.

If you pan the master output hard left, monitor from Output 1 on your audio interface. Vice versa, monitor fromr Output 2 on your audio interface if you choose to pan hard right.

Use the Gain Plugin

The second way to set up a mono output in MainStage is to use the Gain plugin. I prefer this method because there’s less room for error.
The Gain plugin can be found under the Utility submenu. Make sure the Gain plugin is the final plugin in your signal chain. In the screenshot below, you can see the Gain plugin is after the Compressor.

The last step is to turn on the Mono function inside the Gain plugin.

The Gain plugin will fold your mix down to mono, and send the same signal down both Output 1 and Output 2. This means you can monitor the same signal from both outputs, allowing you to route the same mono signal to multiple locations if necessary.
Hi, I’m Brian and I’m an electronic music designer for Broadway shows and other theatrical productions around the world. If you enjoyed this article, consider supporting 441k on Patreon! In addition to a special mention on Decrypto.net, you’ll also get access to my personal templates, workflows, and other nerdy things. Thank you!


How to Use MainStage to Make MIDI Mappings in Ableton Live

August 25, 2017

MIDI map in Ableton Live with MainStage.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to make MIDI mappings in Ableton Live without a hardware MIDI keyboard controller. To accomplish this, we’ll be using Apple MainStage’s external instrument channel strips to communicate with Ableton Live via MacOS’s built-in MIDI IAC Driver.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2T_sHCiIexQ

Create an IAC MIDI Port

MacOS ships with a handy virtual MIDI device called the IAC Driver. It enables you to route MIDI data between software applications without the need for a physical loopback through a hardware MIDI interface.
To access the IAC Driver settings, navigate to ~/Applications/Utilities, and open up the Audio MIDI Setup application. Press ?2 to bring up the MIDI Studio window.

Next, double click on the IAC Driver icon.

Click on the checkbox next to “Device is online,” and then create a new port by clicking on the arrow next to “Add and Remove Ports,” You can name the port whatever you want, but I named mine “TO ABLETON LIVE,”

Create a MainStage Template

Next, we have to create a MainStage template to send MIDI data to Ableton Live via the “TO ABLETON LIVE” IAC Driver port. To do this, we’ll use external instrument channel strips with the correct MIDI port and channel assignments. After these channel strips are set up, all we have to do is click on MainStage’s on-screen keyboard to send MIDI note data to Ableton Live.
To keep things streamlined, just create a layout containing a keyboard with 127 keys. We don’t need any extra pedals or other screen elements because we’re only concerned with transmitting MIDI note data to Ableton Live.
Next, create a patch with an external instrument channel strip with the following settings.

This is what the external instrument channel strip should look like.

Next, copy and paste the patch fifteen times, and change the channel setting on each patch’s channel strip until you have a patch for each of the sixteen MIDI channels. In the screenshot below, the external instrument channel strip in my Channel 8 patch is set to output on MIDI Channel 8.
If you don’t want to go through the trouble of creating a template, click here to support me on Patreon. You’ll get access to the MainStage template used in this tutorial and other exclusive content!
Next, navigate to Ableton Live’s MIDI preferences, and activate the Remote switch for the “TO ABLETON LIVE” MIDI input. This setting allows Ableton Live to receive MIDI mapping data from other sources.

You should now be able to use MainStage’s onscreen keyboard to make MIDI mappings in Ableton Live.

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Hi, I’m Brian and I’m an electronic music designer for Broadway shows and other theatrical productions around the world. If you enjoyed this article, consider supporting 441k on Patreon! In addition to a special mention on Decrypto.net, you’ll also get access to my personal templates, workflows, and other nerdy things. Thank you!


How to Batch Normalize Audio on MacOS with SoX

April 22, 2017

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to batch normalize audio on MacOS with the cross-platform command line utility SoX (Sound Exchange).

Download & Install SoX

To install SoX, you’ll first need to download and install a package manager for MacOS called Homebrew.
Navigate to ~/Applications/Utilities, and click on the Terminal app. Copy and paste the snippet below into the Terminal window.

/usr/bin/ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)

Press Enter to start the installation process.

Press Enter again to continue the installation process. The script will ask for your administrator password to complete the installation.
When the installation is finished, use the snippet below to install SoX.

brew install sox

Next, use Finder to create a folder on your desktop, and place the audio files you want to normalize into the folder. I’ve named my folder 2convert. Create a second folder in the 2convert folder called converted.

Navigate back to Terminal, and use the snippet below to navigate to your newly created 2convert folder.

cd ~/Desktop/2convert

Finally, use the following snippet to normalize all audio files in the 2convert folder to -0.1dB.

for file in *.wav; do sox $file — norm=-0.1 converted/$(basename $file) -V; done

The normalized files can be found in the converted folder.



Questions?

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